2018 Consumer Confidence Report

Click HERE to download the 2018 Consumer Confidence Report PDF.

Information about your Drinking Water

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

-      Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, andwildlife.

-      Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, orfanning.

-      Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residentialuses.

-      Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septicsystems.

-    Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and miningactivities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Contaminants may be found in drinking water that may cause taste, color, or odor problems. These types of problems are not necessarily causes for health concerns. For more information on taste, odor, or color of drinking water, please contact the system's business office.

You may be more vulnerable than the general population to certain microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium, in drinking water. Infants, some elderly, or immunocompromised persons such as those undergoing chemotherapy for cancer; persons who have undergone organ transplants; those who are undergoing treatment with steroids; and people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, can be particularly at risk from infections. You should seek advice about drinking water from your physician or health care providers. Additional guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Information about Source Water

Lead and Copper Copper

Date Sampled

07/20/2017

MCLG

ActionLevel(AL)

90th Percentile

# Sites Over AL

0

Units

ppm

Violation

N

Likely Source of Contamination

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing

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2018 Water Quality Test Results

Disinfection By-Products

Collection Date

2018

Highest Level Detected

14

Range oflndividnal Samples

MCLG

No goal for the total

MCL

60

Units

Violation

N

Likely Source of Contamination

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

2018

41

No goal for the total

80

ppb

N

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

'* The value m the Highest Level or Average Detected column 1s the lughest average of all TTHM sample results collected at a location over a year'

Inorganic Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range oflndividual Samples

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Arsenic

03/09/2017

I

1 - 1

0

IO

ppb

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.

Barium

03/09/2017

2

2

ppm

N

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.

Chromium

03/09/2017

I

1 - 1

100

100

ppb

N

Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits.

Fluoride

03/09/2017

4

ppm

N

Erosion ofnatural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and

aluminum factories.

Nitrate [measured as Nitrogen]

2018

10

10

ppm

N

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Radioactive Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range oflndividual Samples

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Combined Radium 226/228

01/20/2016

0

5

pCi/L

N

Erosion of natural deposits.

Disinfectant Residual

'A blank disinfectant residual table has been added to the CCR template, you will need to add data to the fields. Your data can be taken off the Disinfectant Level Quarterly Operating Reports (DLQOR).'

Disinfectant Residual

Year

Average Level

Range of Levels Detected

MRDL

MRDLG

Unit of Measure

Violation (YIN)

Source in Drinking Water

Chlorine

2018

4

4

Mg/I

NO

Water additive used to control microbes.